Slow lorises enjoy an upgrade at rescue center

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Slow lorises, the world’s only venomous primate, often fare poorly in captivity. Despite this, they are often captured from the wild and sold to be kept as pets. The illegal pet trade and the use of slow lorises in traditional medicine means we often have slow lorises coming through our care at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center. Our animal care staff tries to release the lorises when they can, but injuries and human dependence means some require our long-term care. Lorises are largely insectivorous, but are usually fed on a diet of fruit when people capture them. For many years, we have tried to supplement our captive lorises’ diets by building a grasshopper capture scheme. However, it it does not sufficiently supplement their diets. We recently built a new roofless loris enclosure around some trees and installed solar night lighting to attract insects. Three lorises share the cage and keepers report that they see the lorises catching insects at night and are now eating only around 10% of the food we provide them each day.

Silver Langur baby saved by Wildlife Alliance forest guards

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Wildlife Alliance rangers rescued an infant Silver Langur (Trachypithecus germaini) and a turtle from poachers. The rangers immediately released the turtle back into the protected habitat but the young langur, separated from its mother by poachers, was too young and not able to be released. All silvered langur infants are born with bright orange pelage that changes to a grey color within 3-5 months after birth. The Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team picked up the langur from the ranger station and transported it to the Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center nursery for care. There, our dedicated staff are providing round-the-clock care for the infant and will introduce it to a troop of other rescued langurs.

The Indochinese silvered langur is globally Endangered and is listed in Appendix II of CITES. The silver langur is threatened mainly by hunting for subsistence,  traditional medicine, and the pet trade. Their habitat is also disappearing and is becoming increasingly fragmented due to agricultural expansion. Our forest rangers patrol the Cardamom Rainforest Landscape to ensure these endangered primates are protected from poachers and the forest canopy remains unfragmented.

via Silver Langur baby saved by Wildlife Alliance forest guards

Muntjac with a broken leg saved by the Rangers

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This morning our patrol team received a red muntjac with a broken leg from tourists at Chi Phat.
It was found running on the tourist trail at Veal Taprak with blood on her leg caused by a hunter. The red muntjac was sent to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center for treatment.

via Muntjac with a broken leg saved by the Rangers

Silver Langur baby saved by Wildlife Alliance forest guards

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Wildlife Alliance rangers rescued an infant Silver Langur (Trachypithecus germaini) and a turtle from poachers. The rangers immediately released the turtle back into the protected habitat but the young langur, separated from its mother by poachers, was too young and not able to be released. All silvered langur infants are born with bright orange pelage that changes to a grey color within 3-5 months after birth. The Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team picked up the langur from the ranger station and transported it to the Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center nursery for care. There, our dedicated staff are providing round-the-clock care for the infant and will introduce it to a troop of other rescued langurs.

The Indochinese silvered langur is globally Endangered and is listed in Appendix II of CITES. The silver langur is threatened mainly by hunting for subsistence,  traditional medicine, and the pet trade. Their habitat is also disappearing and is becoming increasingly fragmented due to agricultural expansion. Our forest rangers patrol the Cardamom Rainforest Landscape to ensure these endangered primates are protected from poachers and the forest canopy remains unfragmented.

via Silver Langur baby saved by Wildlife Alliance forest guards

Rescued elephant, Chhouk, receives a new prosthetic foot

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DlqtW2-U4AAfSlnChhouk, our young disabled male elephant, was recently fitted for a new prosthetic foot. We have been working with The Cambodian School of Prosthetics and Orthotics (CSPO) for over 10 years now and they continue to work hard to provide Chhouk with the most innovative shoes around! This new model is 2-3kgs lighter than his previous shoes! The new shoe quickly got Chhouk’s approval and he was running around his enclosure within minutes of trying on the new shoe!

Chhouk was found in 2007, at less than a year old, wandering alone in the forest in Northeast Cambodia. He had not only lost his foot to a poacher’s snare, but he was also gravely ill from the infected wound and severely malnourished. To gain his trust, our rescuers cared for him in the forest for two weeks before transporting him to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center where specialists were able to heal his wounds. Unfortunately, Chhouk’s lower leg had to be amputated but was replaced by a prosthesis from CSPO, which has changed his life completely. Our elephant keepers have trained Chhouk using only reward based positive reinforcement in order to effectively change his prosthetic leg. He is the first elephant in Cambodia to receive a prosthesis and is celebrated as a successful rescue story. Asian elephants are nearly full size at 15 years old, but continue to grow in size and weight until they are around 20-25 years old! At this rate, Chhouk will continue to outgrow his prosthetic legs, but thanks to the diligence of his keepers and CSPO, Chhouk won’t let his disability slow him down!

We also recently commissioned a statute of Chhouk made entirely from poaching snares removed from Cambodia’s forests. This new statue will be placed on permanent exhibit at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center. This is the second statue we have commissioned of Chhouk, the first now proudly displayed in Cambodia’s Ministry of Environment office. The poignant statue will help us to continue to spread awareness about the devastating effects of snares and the deadly consequences for Cambodia’s wildlife.

You can help care for Chhouk and ensure he continues to get new prosthetic legs as he needs them by sponsoring him monthly!

via Rescued elephant, Chhouk, receives a new prosthetic foot

Rescued elephant, Chhouk, receives a new prosthetic foot

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2018-changing-Chhouk-shoe-800x533Chhouk, our young disabled male elephant, was recently fitted for a new prosthetic foot. We have been working with The Cambodian School of Prosthetics and Orthotics (CSPO) for over 10 years now and they continue to work hard to provide Chhouk with the most innovative shoes around! This new model is 2-3kgs lighter than his previous shoes! The new shoe quickly got Chhouk’s approval and he was running around his enclosure within minutes of trying on the new shoe!

Chhouk was found in 2007, at less than a year old, wandering alone in the forest in Northeast Cambodia. He had not only lost his foot to a poacher’s snare, but he was also gravely ill from the infected wound and severely malnourished. To gain his trust, our rescuers cared for him in the forest for two weeks before transporting him to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center where specialists were able to heal his wounds. Unfortunately, Chhouk’s lower leg had to be amputated but was replaced by a prosthesis from CSPO, which has changed his life completely. Our elephant keepers have trained Chhouk using only reward based positive reinforcement in order to effectively change his prosthetic leg. He is the first elephant in Cambodia to receive a prosthesis and is celebrated as a successful rescue story. Asian elephants are nearly full size at 15 years old, but continue to grow in size and weight until they are around 20-25 years old! At this rate, Chhouk will continue to outgrow his prosthetic legs, but thanks to the diligence of his keepers and CSPO, Chhouk won’t let his disability slow him down!

We also recently commissioned a statute of Chhouk made entirely from poaching snares removed from Cambodia’s forests. This new statue will be placed on permanent exhibit at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center. This is the second statue we have commissioned of Chhouk, the first now proudly displayed in Cambodia’s Ministry of Environment office. The poignant statue will help us to continue to spread awareness about the devastating effects of snares and the deadly consequences for Cambodia’s wildlife.

You can help care for Chhouk and ensure he continues to get new prosthetic legs as he needs them by sponsoring him monthly!

via Rescued elephant, Chhouk, receives a new prosthetic foot

Macaque pair rescued from Angkor taken to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center

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Angkor-Macaque-rescue-amari-loriThe Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) traveled to the temples of Angkor to rescue a female macaque and her infant, known as Amari and Lori. The wild macaques were reported to be in poor health. The WRRT have taken the monkeys to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center, where they will be assessed and treated by veterinarians. We will continue to provide updates on their recovery after they have been seen by a vet here and on our social media.

If you would like to donate towards Amari and Lori’s care, please make a donation to “Care for Rescued Wildlife” and mention the Angkor monkeys in the comments.

via Macaque pair rescued from Angkor taken to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center